The Perfect Loaf
Saturday, June 10, 2017


We stumbled on this bread shop close to where the filmmakers for A Sea Change are staying in Copenhagen. No sign outside, we just happened to peer in and saw these scrumptious loaves. They are as good as they look. The crust is chewy yet crisp, and the loaf itself moist. Yeast-free: the bread rises via the sour-dough method. We devoured our bread with the cheese the baker recommended. Also organic, from the shop two doors down. Made with sea salt and reminiscent of Parmesan, the cheese is produced by the well-known green dairy Thise. It's called Vesterhavs, and no, we can't say it either but we can point real good!

It turned out that the bakery was founded by Michelin-starred chef Bo Bech, whose fantasy for years was establishing a bakery with the sole product of the perfect loaf. In our book: fantasy come true. And at a price we can afford: 300 Dkroner.

Recommended storing: outside of your frig, wrapped in a cloth to maintain the gorgeous crust texture.

Bakery address:
Store Kongensgade 46
DK - 1264 Copenhagen K

For more about the bakery and Bo Bec:
http://www.wallpaper.com/lifestyle/fa...
http://uk.bobech.net/

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Niijii Films in Copenhagen
Saturday, June 10, 2017
Barbara, Sven, Angela and Gwen have landed in Copenhagen.  We have at least 4 screenings of A Sea Change planned during the COP-15 conference, and we plan to do everything we can to put the oceans on the agenda of discussion for our nations' leaders. 
While there is little likelihood of a significant treaty being signed in Copenhagen, there are some small glimmers of hope that movement has begun.  With President Obama and the Chinese government both signaling a willingness to commit to hard CO2 reduction targets, it appears that perhaps a treaty might eventually emerge.  However, until the CO2 starts dropping, the only reduction that is occurring involves the pH level of our oceans.
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Coral Reefs Vulnerable to Ocean Acidification
Saturday, June 10, 2017

read caption below

Coral reefs may be even more sensitive than previously thought to ocean acidification. See this recent news on a study conducted by USGS.


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NOAA defines ocean acidification
Saturday, June 10, 2017

This is a detailed, clean explanation of what ocean acidification is. Straight from the horse's mouth, so to speak, i.e., from the NOAA website. NOAA is the U.S. government agency specifically charged with studying ocean and climate, fyi. You pronounce the acronym just like that guy from the Bible: remember the ark? It stands for National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration.


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Sustainable tech info on the web
Saturday, June 10, 2017

ok, this is very cool: a website about sustainable technology put together by Mykel Pereira. a high school student. Wind, solar, tidal, bioplastic, and more. Plus the site design is clean, though I'd shorten the line lengths a tad for easier scanning. Definitely worth a visit.

A method for dealing with excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere that's being explored: air capture. Capture it from point of release and store it at great depth, in rock or the ocean or as mineral carbonates. Of course, as Pereira points out, depositing the excess CO2 in the ocean would just exacerbate ocean acidification.

Geological formations are currentlyconsidered the most promising sequestration sites, and these are estimated to have a storage capacity of at least 2000 Gt CO2 (currently, 30 Gt per year of CO2 is emitted due to human activities).

Hmm. I wonder what the long-range consequences of injecting gaseous CO2 into rock are?
 


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The ocean as a limestone dump
Saturday, June 10, 2017

Here's a solution to the problem of ocean acidification: dump in a bunch of limestone to neutralize it. Evidently it works, according to Danny Harvey at the University of Toronto.

You'd have to dump in quite a lot, though. Try 4 billion tons. Per year. Over decades.

Even assuming its ecological side effects are relatively benign (a big"if"), the scheme has little chance of being implemented, says KenCaldeira of Stanford University's Carnegie Institution, who describedHarvey's plan as "unrealistic" and a mere "theoretical possibility."


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What doesn't kill us makes us stronger
Saturday, June 10, 2017

Algae Fights Ocean Acidification

Some organisms seem to be adapting to ocean acidification. Live Science is reporting on a study conducted by scientists at the University of Washington of tiny plants called coccolithophores. A kind of algae, they respond to increased acidity by building thicker shells.

This does not mean go out and buy that Hummer you've been thinking about: plenty of other organisms can't handle it. Coral, oysters, and clams, for a start.


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They get it in Europe
Saturday, June 10, 2017

The European Union is stepping up to the plate.

Even though the full ramifications of ocean acidification aren't yet known, they're not waiting around. Rather, they're launching an EU-wide initiative to study the phenomenon.

Ocean acidification is happening today and it's happening on top of global warming, so we are in double trouble" stated [Jelle] Bijma.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080521105251.htm#


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Will Bush turn blue? Possible blue legacy in the works
Saturday, June 10, 2017

A yellow tang near the Northern Marianas Island of Maug.

National Public Radio has just reported that President Bush is considering the creation of a number of marine reserves. If created, they would represent a huge conservation program, one of the largest ever.

This would be cool, if it happens. Evidently it's all still in the planning stages, and the Bush administration has not commented publicly on exactly which areas would be protected. Strong possibilities, according to Jay Nelson of the Pew Environment Group, are an area in the Central Pacific including the islands of Palmyra, Howland and Baker, an area in the Western Pacific around the Northern Mariana Islands, and a 500-square-mile reserve around Rose Atoll in the South Pacific east of Australia. (Note that Rose Atoll itself is already designated a National Wildlife Refuge protecting, among other creatures, migratory sea birds, the endangered hawksbill sea turtle, and a rare species of giant clam.

Being designated as reserves would protect these areas from fishing and energy exploration.

But what about the water flowing into and around them? It wouldn't get the U.S. off the hook in terms of signing the Kyoto Protocol and creating a consistent policy for coping with climate change and ocean acidification. Might this not just be blue-washing on the part of the Bush administration?


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Too close for comfort
Saturday, June 10, 2017

Now it's in the U.S. backyard: elevated pH levels in the Pacific, within 20 miles of the coast, documented for the first time.

The data are reported in a study authored by Richard Feely, Christopher Sabine, J. Marting Hernandez-Ayon, Debby Ianson, and Burke Hales, summarized in Science Express.

The area studied is known for its seasonal upwellings of water from the deeper ocean. It seems especially alarming because this water is at least 50 years old, and its showing higher acidity. Which means that, because the level of CO2 in the atmosphere has been steadily increasing, we can expect that upwellings will show steadily increasing acidity.

Hales puts it this way:

"The coastal ocean acidification train has left the station and there not much we can do to derail it."


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