July, July!
Saturday, June 10, 2017
By Daniel de la Calle

Some news before the month comes to an end:

≈  "The Australian government announced plans to construct the largest network of marine reserves in the world, more than doubling the number of coastal reserves to 60 from its existing 27. The new regulations will limit fishing and oil and gas drilling in waters off of the country’s eastern coast, including the vulnerable and endangered Great Barrier Reef and the northeastern Coral Sea. The Australian government expanded the marine reserve system in order to preserve its marine life and balance environmental protections with the needs of its economy, and the new laws will go into effect later this year […]
Because the new reserves, which will cover a total of 3.1 million square kilometers (approximately 1.2 million square miles), will significantly impact fishing in the area, the Australian government will pay its fishing industry $99.3 million ($100 million in Australian dollars) as a consolation prize."

SOURCE
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≈  Staff at the NZMSC and Aquarium in Portobello, New Zealand, wondered how hermit crabs squeeze their bodies into discarded snail shells and how they would be able to get a peek into what happens inside.  That is how they came to asking University of Otago's scientific glass blower Anne Ryan to replicate a snail shell in transparent glass. Brilliant.
SOURCE

≈  Senator John Kerry plans to assemble a sweeping committee review of the world's oceans this coming September.  “It is going to be an analysis of what is happening in the oceans globally in terms of fisheries, development, acidification, pollution, all aspects of the oceans,” he explained in a recent interview with E2.  Mr. Kerry expects the hearings to span five days, and they will “inevitably involve” an examination of the effects of Ocean Acidification and climate change.
SOURCE

≈  The trailer for a brand new documentary about the oceans titled Ocean Frontiers: The Dawn of a New Era in Ocean Stewardship.
"The myth of the boundless ocean is no more. It's time for a new way of thinking, a new way of living, in concert with the sea and in consideration of those yet to come."


≈  Full-time job offer: Program Manager, Ocean Acidification
"ABOUT THE POSITION: "This position is responsible for providing program support and management on a collaborative effort among Ocean Conservancy, the larger ocean conservation community and industry partners to raise visibility on solutions-oriented ocean conservation with a special focus on ocean acidification. The position will work with the Director to help coordinate partner efforts, and will manage the program’s efforts to develop external voices in support of local and regional solutions to address ocean acidification.
APPLY FOR THE POSITION: If you think you have what it takes to join Ocean Conservancy's team, please send a cover letter speaking to your qualifications and abilities along with your resume and salary expectations to: jobs@oceanconservancy.org and note your name and "Program Manager, Ocean Acidification - #1209" in the subject line.
"

≈  NOAA announced on July 11th "the first steps of a national strategy to protect sea life from ocean acidification. The draft plan is intended to guide federal research and monitoring on ocean acidification, and ultimately lead to the development of adaptation and mitigation strategies. […]
“This plan is a good first step toward addressing the tragedy unfolding in our oceans,” said Emily Jeffers, a staff attorney with the Center for Biological Diversity’s oceans program, which recently called on President Barack Obama to develop a national action plan for ocean acidification. “But if we’re going to save sea life from ocean acidification, we need to move quickly on big, bold steps that dramatically reduce carbon pollution.” […]
“We need to take immediate action to address ocean acidification or the impacts will be catastrophic,” said Jeffers. “We need a bold national action plan to ensure a future for our sea life.”
"
SOURCE

≈  This past June the California Academy of Sciences hosted the first annual KQED Science Youth Media Festival. Young filmmakers participates in a showcase of over 20 videos about environmental issues that ranged from air quality, greenhouse gases, water quality, food justice or sustainability to conservation and Ocean Acidification.  Jurors awarded three winning videos and one of them is about Ocean Acidification:


≈  Two astounding macro videos of corals:




≈  These powerful juxtapositions of before and after photographs were shared at the the recent International Coral Reef Symposium in Australia.---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SOURCE
≈  ≈ 

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The Doom of Hope
Saturday, June 10, 2017
By Daniel de la Calle

Two weeks ago Professor Roger Bradbury (Australian National University) signed a New York Times op-ed piece in which the real situation and improbably future of coral reefs was for once spelled with all its letters, not softened by gentle words and nonexistent bright sides.  
As a specie we might feel change and solutions can only come through hope.  We have become slaves of this idea, unable to accept points of no return or definitive endings anywhere.  Our collective imaginary is based on such a notion, Hollywood knew soon how to make a profitable industry of it and churches and faiths will stay amongst us until the end; it is who we are.  Like the fascination with the dodo, the magic for us is not in the giant bird walking once around a distant island, what we simply cannot wrap our heads around is that it is truly and definitively extinct, that we ate the last one.  This impossibility of the impossible is what we hold on to and swear by, so the reason for our perseverance and success will likely be the detonator of our fall.  
I have often wondered if we might just be genetically programmed to react rather than to prevent.  The problem with Ocean Acidification and endless list of environmental threats above our heads today is that we do not have the luxury of a second chance in which to apply experience to undo the wrong.  That clear unequivocal proof so many demand, the 125 degree summer month, will only come the day after "too late", which in some cases probably took place some time ago.
Bill Mckibben's long, absolutely brilliant, article in this month's Rolling Stone is as true and devastating to read.  It would be unfair to quote a small paragraph here or there: if you have not done it yet, please read here about Global Warming's Terrifying New Math.
Elizabeth Kolbert also wrote a comment just now in The New Yorker about corn pollination and high temperatures that certainly goes well with this depressing summer post.  Take a minute to read The Big Heat HERE.

Finally, if I have not bummed you completely out yet please consider watching this video from photographer Chris Jordan's doc-in-progress Midway:
"On one of the remotest islands on our planet, tens of thousands of baby albatrosses lie dead on the ground, their bodies filled with plastic from the Pacific Garbage Patch…"

MIDWAY : trailer : a film by Chris Jordan from Midway on Vimeo.


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Free Popcorn and Lemonade Screening
Saturday, June 10, 2017
By Daniel de la Calle

The Duke Chapel Congregation has scheduled a free outdoor screening of A Sea Change this Friday, July 20th (at dusk, around 8:30PM). Moviegoers "are encouraged to bring their own lawn chairs and blankets. Free popcorn and lemonade will be provided. A discussion will follow the film. In case of rain, the event will be moved inside."
SOURCE

"Ocean advocate Céline Cousteau and cartoonist Jim Toomey (creator of Sherman's Lagoon) teamed up with the World Resources Institute to bring you Coral Reefs: Polyps in Peril. This short animated film tells the story of coral reefs with humor and admiration for these wondrous ecosystems.  Learn about the unique biology of coral reefs and their importance to people around the world, as well as the serious threats that they face due to overfishing, pollution, and climate change.  But don't let that get you down!  The film also explores what individuals can do to help save coral reefs, including supporting sustainable seafood and tourism providers, reducing your CO2 footprint, and promoting coral reef conservation. "


Job offers: "The GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre of Ocean Research, Kiel, Germany  and the Christian-Albrechts University, Kiel, Germany seek highly motivated and excellent candidates owning a Master’s or Diplom degree for the following 2 PhD positions in Marine Ecology and Marine Microbiology starting September 1st, 2012 (provided funding is granted).
The 2 PhD projects are part of the Bioacid II benthic consortium which will investigate in joint and interdisciplinary mesocosm experiments the biogeochemical, genetic, physiological, evolutionary and ecological impacts of multifactorial climate change on benthic communities[…]. Candidates should have a good knowledge in written and spoken English is expected.
"
MORE INFO
SOURCE

Dr. Francisco Chávez, of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research institute, talks about Ocean Acidification and research done in Peru.


SOURCE

The following video, shown this past July at RIO+20, shows Jason Hall-Spencer talking about Ocean Acidification. Mr. Hall-Spencer is a researcher for the Save Our Seas Foundation:


We mentioned the recent International Coral Reef Symposyum held in Cairns, Australia, in our last blog post.  This is a Reuters video about it:



SOURCE

A heart-warming story about people, the ocean and saving whales:
"Michael Fishbach narrates his encounter with a humpback whale entangled in a fishing net. Gershon Cohen and he have founded The Great Whale Conservancy to protect whales. ‪http://www.greatwhaleconservancy.org‬, is their website, or go to gwc's facebook page, and join them in helping to save these magnificent beings."


Upwell.com has posted a few simple guidelines concerning how to talk about Ocean Acidification in Public.  Read them HERE.
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Not Only Ocean Acidification
Saturday, June 10, 2017
By Daniel de la Calle

Marine researchers from around the world are in Cairns, Australia, this week for the 12th International Coral Reef Symposium (July 9-13):
"From Cairns, 2,600 scientists have signed a Consensus Statement on Climate Change and Coral Reefs.
The consensus statement calls for a worldwide effort to overcome growing threats to coral ecosystems and to the livelihoods of millions of people who depend on them. It is urging immediate action to stave off what the scientists are calling "escalating damage" to coral reefs, as a result of rising sea temperatures, ocean acidification, overfishing and pollution from the land.
The World Resources Institute has also just published a new report called Reefs at Risk Revisited in the Coral Triangle. The report, a map-based analysis of threats to coral reefs around the world, particularly hones in on the countries of the Coral Triangle - Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Solomon Islands, and Timor-Leste.
According to the report, more than 85% of reefs within the Coral Triangle region are threatened by local stressors, such as overfishing, pollution, and coastal development.

Speaking from Cairns at the ICRS2012, Jeremy Jackson, a senior scientist from the Smithsonian Institution, said reefs globally have seen severe declines in coral cover over several decades. 

In the Caribbean, for instance, he said 75-85% of the coral cover has been lost in the past 35 years. 

Jackson, the 2012 recipient of the Darwin Medal, said that even Australia's Great Barrier Reef, one of the best-protected reef ecosystems on the planet, has experienced a 50% decline in coral cover in the past 50 years.


Satellite image of part of the Great Barrier Reef adjacent to the Queensland coastal areas of Airlie Beach and Mackay. Image by Wikimedia Commons

.
Jackson said climate change is making this already rapid decline of coral reefs worse. He also touched on how climate change is causing increased droughts, agricultural failure and sea level rises at much faster rates.

"That means what's good for reefs is also critically important for people and we should wake up to that fact," Jackson said. "The future of coral reefs isn't a marine version of tree-hugging but a central problem for humanity."

According to the marine experts, coral reefs provide food and livelihood for many tens of millions of coastal inhabitants globally, as well as having tourism spin-offs. The scientists estimate that reefs provide upwards of US$170bn to US$375bn in goods and services globally each year."
You can read the report HERE
SOURCE (www.siliconrepublic.com)

The Higgs Boson spent the last few days being the center of media coverage, but must confess that neither had I ever heard about it before nor did I understand much more after watching the news and doing some online reading.  The following video has proven most helpful for me so far, so I include it in our blog as public service to all those in my situation:


Considering most of the research has been carried out at CERN's Large Hadron Collider you might also want to watch and dance to this popular rap-music video clip about the 27k subterranean facility:


The University of São Paulo in Brazil has organized a short three-day course between December 4-6, 2012 titled "Studying Ocean Acidification and its Effects on Marine Ecosystems".  Speakers include Andrew Dickson, from Scripps Institute of Oceanography, Chris Langdon, University of Miami, Joanie Kleypas, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Lisa Robbins of the US Geological Survey and Sarah Cooley, from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.
More info HERE

Www.barelyimaginedbeings.com hosts the blog for an upcoming book titled "The Book of Barely Imagined Beings", by Caspar Henderson.
"Most real creatures that we think we know embody wonders we have hardly dreamt of. And there are other beings, equally real, which for most of human experience have been beyond imagining. As the Chinese philosopher Zhuangzi wrote about 2,300 years ago, “all the creatures in this world have dimensions that cannot be calculated.”"

"Planktonic forams floating in the upper levels of the oceans sequester about one quarter of all carbonate produced in the oceans each year."

Whole Living proposes "five easy (and scientifically proven) ways to cut carbon and save money":
1. Drive a more fuel-efficient car can translate in $18,000 savings over the car's lifespan.
2. Using LED bulbs instead of conventional ones. You get the same light for 15% of the electricity (saving $100 annually).
3. Washing clothes in cold instead of hot water (another $100).
4. Power strips curb "phantom loads" and reduce the electricity bill (just a strip for the printer can save $130 a year).
5. Sealing and insulating the house properly. Air leaks can be responsible for 15 to 25% of your heating and cooling.
SOURCE

How long can you hold your breath for underwater? A minute? Two? And what do you think the world record in static apnea might be? 1, 2, 5, 10, 15 minutes?
In early June German free diver Tom Sietas, 35, set the new world record competing with former world record holder, Brazilian Ricardo Bahía, by holding his breath for 22 minutes and 22 seconds (no typo). People can also accomplish incredible things underwater.
SOURCE
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8 VIDEOS
Saturday, June 10, 2017
By Daniel de la Calle

≈‪Introducing Mission Aquarius - Dive into an Underwater Laboratory
"This may be the final mission to Aquarius Reef Base, the world's last remaining underwater science lab.
On July 16 One World One Ocean will join Dr. Sylvia Earle, National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence, Liquid Pictures 3D, and a team of aquanauts for a 6-day expedition to a "research only" zone in Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, home to Aquarius, the last remaining underwater lab in the world. We will bring you live interviews and in-depth coverage.
Since 1993, America's "inner space station" has helped us understand the disappearance of coral reefs, train NASA astronauts for space and research sea sponges, the source of two cancer drugs. The discoveries made at Aquarius have opened our eyes to how little we really know about the vast complexity of the ocean. It is one of the planet's most important brain trusts, and it is about to be closed.
IMAX, RED, GoPro and DSLR cameras were used to capture the beauty of this special place."


 

Ocean acidification and biodiversity 1‬

 

BBC Global Dimming Documentary About Geoengineering & Global Warming‬
"A BBC documentary about how unintentional increased reflectance due to man made pollution has actually hidden the affects of increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere."


Beyond River Mile Five
"For nearly 100 years wild salmon populations along the Elwha River, located at the heart of Olympic National Park, have been limited to a five-mile stretch of the 45 mile-long river below the Elwha and Glines Canyon dams. In September 2011 engineers began the Nation’s second largest ecological restoration project; a three-year dam removal process, allowing wild salmon and other anadromous fish populations to return to the upper channels and tributaries of the river. But how effective will these restoration efforts be, and how do we measure success? Kinsey Frick, George Pess, and John McMillan, scientists from the Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, Washington, in partnership with other federal, state and tribal organizations in the region are working together to find answers to these important questions. Their research will not only help us understand the impacts of dam removal on wild salmon populations and ecosystems in the Elwha and allow managers to manage the recovering system adaptively, but also help inform future river restoration projects throughout the country"


Can we get the ocean to absorb more CO2? A possible way to fix the climate‬
A clip from "Five Ways to Save the World".


Effects of ocean acidification and temperature rise on the boring rates of sponges‬
"STRI fellow Amber Stubler, from Stony Brook University, talks about her research on the effects of ocean acidification and temperature rise on the boring rates of sponges in Bocas del Toro, Panama."


NOAA Ocean Acidification
"Ocean Acidification is a global-scale change in the basic chemistry of oceans that is under way now, as a direct result of the increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. We are just beginning to understand the impacts of Ocean Acidification on life in the ocean. The moniker osteoporosis of the sea, gives you a hint about some of its impacts. To learn more about ocean acidification, please visit ‪http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/co2/OA/‬."


‪NOAA Ocean Acidification - The Other Carbon Dioxide Problem‬
"Fundamental changes in seawater chemistry are occurring throughout the world's oceans. Since the beginning of the industrial revolution, the release of carbon dioxide (CO2) from humankind's industrial and agricultural activities has increased the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere. The ocean absorbs almost a third of the CO2 we release into the atmosphere every year, so as atmospheric CO2 levels increase, so do the levels in the ocean. Initially, many scientists focused on the benefits of the ocean removing this greenhouse gas from the atmosphere. However, decades of ocean observations now show that there is also a downside — the CO2 absorbed by the ocean is changing the chemistry of the seawater, a process called ocean acidification. This change in the ocean's chemistry will have profound effects on life in the ocean, and those who depend on it."


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Sex! (A.K.A. News)
Saturday, June 10, 2017
By Daniel de la Calle

Media Matters for America (by "America" they mean the USA) released a study last week showing the "Kardashians get 40 times more news coverage than Ocean Acidification", which was great news for the Kardashians, for Ocean Acidification and for me. For me because I finally got to see some pictures of these young and beautiful women, for the Kardashians because their name-brand was mentioned once again and it will all be helpful launching a new line of lingerie and for Ocean Acidification because linking it to the Kardashians to denounce (yes, never mind the paradox) what the media and us the public are interested in will attract residual curiosity and subsequent knowledge of the dangerous pH drop in the world's waters.  I do not see any reason why when cars, home insurances or mineral waters are sold beside the image of attractive feminine figures science and environmental threats should not follow suit.  The connection in the case of Ocean Acidification is, I believe, much more obvious:
Ocean Acidification=decalcifying low pH=loss in biodiversity and extinctions
Kardashians=sexual desire=reproduction=abundant breast milk with tons of calcium
You probably want to read more about it, so HERE.
But there have been other news about Ocean Acidification that caught my eye:

Washington State oyster grower moves hatchery to Hawaii.
"After 34 years rearing shellfish in Willapa Bay, Dave Nisbet was in a bind: Nature had stopped providing.
Oysters were no longer reproducing naturally on the Washington Coast. Oyster larvae were even dying in nearby hatcheries, which use seawater to raise baby shellfish that get sold as starter seed to companies like Nisbet's Goose Point Oysters.
But when, in 2009, Nisbet heard oceanographers identify the likely culprit — increasingly corrosive ocean water, a byproduct of the same greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming — the oysterman did the unthinkable.
Nisbet took out a loan and spent three years testing and building a new hatchery that opened recently. In Hawaii
." READ MORE OF THIS SEATTLE TIMES ARTICLE

Continuing with sexuality and reproduction, on occasions scientific research is devoted to the specifics: Check this study on the "Effects of Ocean Acidification on Motility and Swimming Speed of Sea Urchin Sperm".

A recently finished international workshop at the University of Washington (Seattle) has tried to create an Ocean Acidification Observing Network of Ship Surveys, Moorings, Floats and Gliders in the seas. READ MORE

Jan Vicente, Graduate student at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology has been awarded the pretigious Dr. Nancy Foster Scholarship to study the effects of Ocean Acidification on sponges.
"Research efforts have focused on the impact of ocean acidification on corals, while there is a lack of research on the impact it may have on how sponges build their skeletons. Vicente will study how increased concentrations of carbon dioxide are affecting the sponges' ability to synthesize spicules and collagen fibers that make up their skeleton.
He will be monitoring the silicatein and collagen genes of two common Florida Keys sponges in particular, the Black Ball Sponge and the Red Vase Sponge, under simulated ocean acidification conditions. In addition, he will study the bacterial communities that live on the sponges to determine if they can serve as biological indicators of environmental stressors, such as ocean acidification and climate change.
Sponges are an integral part of coral reefs, accounting for as much as 60% of some coral reefs in the Caribbean. The most common sponges found in coral reefs are responsible for filtering the water and returning essential nutrients to the reef
."
SOURCE

Richard Feely, Senior Scientist at NOAA, talks to Pavilion TV at RIO+20 about the consequences of Ocean Acidification in marine life sustainability and the availability of fish for people's diets:

Rio+20: Richard Feely, Senior Scientist at U.S National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration from Responding to Climate Change on Vimeo.


The second half of the video posted earlier this week titled "RIO+20: Addressing Ocean Acidification":

Video streaming by Ustream
A video on Ocean Acidification by the UNEP (United Nations Environment Programme):


And yet another documentary short on Ocean Acidification "made as an AP Environmental Science project" found on Youtube:

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Summer News
Saturday, June 10, 2017
By Daniel de la Calle

Children in Rio de Janeiro were on vacation for the three Rio+20 summit days. Schools organized activities that involved the environment, sustainability, recycling, awareness; like this sculpture made out of used plastic bottles.

Science Magazine recently published an article on Ocean Acidification and the results coming from a new high resolution computer model and revealing the profound impact it will have over the next four decades "on waters off the West Coast of the United States, home to one of the world's most diverse marine ecosystems and most important commercial fisheries. These impacts have the potential to upend the entire marine ecosystem and affect millions of people dependent upon it for food and jobs."
THIS is the link to the article and if you click HERE you can watch an animation on the changes in the California Current System

LINK to an New York Times opinion piece by John Beddington and Jane Lubchenco on Ocean Acidification (written prior the RIO+20 summit held last week).

VIDEO: "Rio+20: Addressing Ocean Acidification"
"Seawater chemistry is changing due to the ocean’s absorption of carbon dioxide. Ocean acidification is an emerging global issue with potentially serious impacts on the marine environment, marine biodiversity, and food security. This event explores our current understanding of ocean acidification and its potential impacts, discusses opportunities for international collaboration and capacity-building, and highlights the importance of ocean acidification research through an international observing network."

SOURCE

Want to watch a slideshow on the effects of Ocean Acidification in Manila clams?:
SOURCE

Just a quick reminder of the upcoming "Oceans in a High Carbon Dioxide World" symposyum to be held in Monterey, California, between the 24th and the 27th of September.  It will be the largest gathering of international experts (about 500) on Ocean Acidification.  
MORE INFO
SOURCE

Watch the preview of an upcoming student-created documentary on Ocean Acidification:

Ocean Acidification (Preview) from mrmayo on Vimeo.


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Summer News Sample
Saturday, June 10, 2017

By Daniel de la Calle


Children in Rio de Janeiro were on vacation during the three days of the Rio+20 summit. Some schools organized activities for them, such as art projects using plastics and recyclable materials.

Science Magazine recently published an article on Ocean Acidification and the results coming from a new high resolution computer model and revealing the profound impact it will have over the next four decades "on waters off the West Coast of the United States, home to one of the world's most diverse marine ecosystems and most important commercial fisheries. These impacts have the potential to upend the entire marine ecosystem and affect millions of people dependent upon it for food and jobs."
THIS is the link to the article and if you click HERE you can watch an animation on the changes in the California Current System

LINK to an New York Times opinion piece by John Beddington and Jane Lubchenco on Ocean Acidification (written prior the RIO+20 summit held last week)

VIDEO: "Rio+20: Addressing Ocean Acidification"
"Seawater chemistry is changing due to the ocean’s absorption of carbon dioxide. Ocean acidification is an emerging global issue with potentially serious impacts on the marine environment, marine biodiversity, and food security. This event explores our current understanding of ocean acidification and its potential impacts, discusses opportunities for international collaboration and capacity-building, and highlights the importance of ocean acidification research through an international observing network."

Want to watch a slideshow on the effects of Ocean Acidification in Manila clams?:
SOURCE

Just a quick reminder of the upcoming "Oceans in a High Carbon Dioxide World" symposyum to be held in Monterey, California, between the 24th and the 27th of September.  It will be the largest gathering of international experts (about 500) on Ocean Acidification.  
MORE INFO
SOURCE

Watch the preview of an upcoming student created documentary on Ocean Acidification:

Ocean Acidification (Preview) from mrmayo on Vimeo.

Student Created Preview for an upcoming documentary about ocean acidification.


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THE FUTURE WE WANT and THE FUTURE WE DON'T WANT
Saturday, June 10, 2017
By Daniel de la Calle

I am sure you have seen this image all over the media these days.  I took it on my way to the airport, the night I was leaving Rio: Fish made out of plastic bottles, illuminated at night.  They were placed on Botafogo beach, the nearest beach to downtown Rio de Janeiro, and with iconic Sugarloaf right behind the scene cries for a perfect image that can only be that, picture perfect.  The unseen truth is that what would probably be Rio's most beautiful beach is polluted to the point that nobody dares to ever get in. Sewers and some even more frightening fluids have flown into the small beach for decades, poisoning it to the point of being seriously toxic.
Not far from it tens of thousands of people and hundreds of NGOs gathered, demonstrated, sang and created for over a week very imaginative displays to call for a change, a change that could have happened some 20 miles out of town, in Rio Centro ("Rio Center" or "Rio Downtown"), a center that was strategically placed in a huge enclosed area far from the city of Rio itself.  Traffic is notoriously bad heading to the Barra da Tijuca.  It can take locals up to two hours to get into town or get back home through the tunnels.  But this was no problem for the dignitaries, presidents and decision makers that were to sign "The Future We Want", since there seemed to be many army helicopters at their disposal to fly over the mountains, avoiding traffic, into quiet Rio Centro.
There is "The Future We Want", "The Future We Don't Want" and maybe there should have been "The Only Possible Future".
The first one is too long a text, so please click on the above link.
"The Only Possible Future" will be written and signed in a hundred years or so.  And this below is

The future we don't want


(clink to sign the petition) 
"We – the civil society organizations and social and justice movements who have responded to the call of the United Nations General Assembly to participate in the Rio+20 process – feel that the current state of negotiations severely threatens the future of all people and undermines the relevance and credibility of the United Nations.

After more than two years of intense negotiations and millions of dollars invested on the UN CSD 2012 Rio+20 conference, governments are unable and unwilling to reaffirm the commitments on fundamental principles they made in Rio in 1992.

Governments must realize that they receive their mandates from their citizenry people and that they must act in its best interest. They must be imbued with a long-term vision, an environmentally-informed mind set, so as to guarantee the sustainable development of civilizations and the best future for all, the future we all really want.

Although governments are apparently unable to resiliently deal with the current global economic crisis (a problem confirmed in the G20 meeting in Mexico this weekend), we believe that this is the perfect moment, with potentially cathartic momentum, to embrace sustainable development, social and environmental justice. This is not the time to abandon it on grounds of austere fiscal policies or allegedly pro-growth pressures in the North. We urge the Government of Brazil, the UNCSD Secretary General and all Member States to stop negotiating their short-term national agendas and to urgently agree now on transitional actions for global sustainable progress.

We want governments to deliver the people’s legitimate agenda and the realization of rights, democracy and sustainability, as well as respect for transparency, accountability and the honoring of promises and accomplishments already. Sadly, time is running out. A rushed and weak agreement will be neither acceptable to us nor representative of the future we all want.

We urge our fellow 99% citizens of the world to stand up for the future we really want, and not this one, imposed by a few: the 1% negotiators and their elite constituencies.

For all, let their voices of the majority finally shape the future."

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Fog
Saturday, June 10, 2017

By Daniel de la Calle

 

June 20th, with the RIO+20 summit here in Brazil.  An agreement to be signed by the heads of governments and ministers was reached yesterday.  It is raining, misty, clouds cover at times the peaks encircling Guanabara Bay.

We have a screening downtown, in the Museu da República, at 6:30PM this evening.  Come by, watch the film and join the discussion if you are in Rio de Janeiro.  It would be great to see you.

A song. Fog

"There's a little child
Running round this house
And he never leaves
He will never leave
And the fog comes up from the sewers
And glows in the dark
Baby alligators in the sewers grow up fast
Grow up fast
Anything you want it can be done
How did you go bad?
Did you go bad?
Did you go bad?
Somethings will never wash away
Did you go bad?
Did you go bad?"


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